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"The little trick of getting three objects to dance around in your hands has always managed to keep a small sense of magic...It's one form of insanity we feel everyone has a right to experience."
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PRESS
Juggling Therapy for Female Anxiety Sufferers
Posted May 1, 2007
Effect of juggling therapy on anxiety disorders in female patients

BioPsychoSocial Medicine 2007, 1:10
May 1, 2007

Abstract

Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of juggling therapy for anxiety disorder patients.

Design and Method: Subjects were 17 female outpatients who met the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for anxiety disorders. Subjects were treated with standard psychotherapy, medication and counseling for 6 months. For the last 3 months of treatment, subjects were randomized into either a non-juggling group (n = 9) or a juggling therapy group (juggling group: n = 8). The juggling group gradually acquired juggling skills by practicing juggling beanbags (otedama in Japan) with both hands. The therapeutic effect was evaluated using scores of psychological testing (STAI: State and Trate Anxiety Inventry, POMS: Profile of Mood Status) and of ADL (FAI: Franchay Activity Index) collected before treatment, 3 months after treatment (before juggling therapy), and at the end of both treatments.

Results: After 6 months, an analysis of variance revealed that scores on the state anxiety, trait anxiety subscales of STAI and tension-anxiety (T-A) score of POMS were significantly lower in the juggling group than in the non-juggling group (p < 0.01). Depression, anger-hostility scores of POMS were improved more than non-jugglers. In the juggling group, activity scores on the vigor subscale of POMS and FAI score were significantly higher than those in the non juggling group (p < 0.01). Other mood scores of POMS did not differ between the two groups.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that juggling therapy may be effective for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

The full article can be found here.
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